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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
too many of india's police are abuse and failing at their jobs. >> parts of india have been modernizing past. the police force is still antiquated, ill-equipped and underresourced and under real pressure to fight crime. that's why some offices are cutting corners. >> and it's the people's photo shoot. why one of britain's top celebrity snappers is turning his camera on a thousand members of the public. >> hello to you. right now north korea's state news agency is reporting the country's leader kim jung il has issued a special pardon to two jailed american journalists, sentenced to 12 years hard labor for crossing the border from china illegally. now, this in the midst of a surprise trip to north korea by former u.s. president bill clinton and an historic meeting with the country's reclusive and its believed ailing leader. mr. clinton also met with two american journalists, laura ling and euna lee in what's being described as a very emotional meeting. these two women have been held in pyongyang since march. they had already begun serving a 12-year sentence with hard labor. le
in print. one of the documentaries we did was in india. it was a very interesting story that we are going to go with that had to do with a group of women in a little village who had organized themselves and built a road to their village. these were women who had taught themselves how to do this work, and then confronted the men and ended up getting the men to pay them for the work. we decided that was a story we cannot do on radio, because no one spoke english. we did all the interviews the translation and reviewed all the tapes and said we just cannot put this on air, because people will be listening to half an hour of language they do not understand. >> how have you found your time being spent, now that you do this plus your column? >> audio and radio work is very time-consuming. there are lots of things to pull together. probably the last year i have spent more time doing audio work than anything else. this year i suspect i will flip a little bit and devote more time to print. i am about to start working on a new book as well. >> what is it about? >> i wrote a book close to 15 years ag
. they looked at the impact of floods in countries like india and parts of asia, what it would have on neighboring countries. guest: if you think about water as our most important life support system and the vehicle through which we'll feel the impacts of climate change whether it's drought, desertification, seasonality of rivers, where before they ran year-round, all of that is going to change the world as we know it. host: we will get to viewer phone calls in a moment. i want to give folks a look at some of what blue august is about on planet green this month. here's a look. >> the ocean needs our help. time is running out. >> people have heard about global warming for years but it is only the past five years that experts really understood that carbon dioxide is causing problems for the oceans as well. what is worrisome it has not been on the radar. >> in a few decades it will profoundly altered oceans chemistry, rapidly making the water more acidic. >> scientists have demonstrated that if we continue to pollute as we are now, the ocean as said it will double by the end of the cen
's main landmark, the gateway of india. more than 50 people were killed and nearly 180 were wounded. last week, a special court convicted two men and a woman of planting the bombs. outside, the main prosecution lawyer had this to say. >> this decision is very important and it will send a strong signal to anyone who wants to engage in this kind of illegal activity costing the lives of the innocent population. >> a judge handed them the death penalty. all three have pleaded not guilty and are expected to appeal against the sentence. their trial took place in high security and under a powerful anti-terrorism law that no longer exists. prosecutors argued that the bombings were carefully planned arab -- and or an act of extreme brutality. all three deserve the harsh sentence, they said. the bombings were said to be in retaliation of anti-muslim riots in 2002. all three are said to be members of a pakistani militants group accused of carrying out last year's mumbai attacks, which has increased friction between india and pakistan. >> just a footnote there, pakistan issued a global alert for 13 s
swine flu worldwide. this week, india confirmed its first death, a teenage girl. the announcement led to panic and scuffle. a new trial started in moscow over the killing of the investigative journalist, a staunch critic of the kremlin. the retrial was necessary after an overturned acquittal of the three men accused of involvement in the killing. huge crowds turned out in the philippines as they paid their last respects to be former president. she led the power up writing in 1986. an indian court sentenced two men and women to death for their part in the mumbai bombings of 2003 which killed 52 and injured hundreds. investigators said that all three had links to a pakistan- based terrorist group. more details from delhi. >> the attack in 2003 was devastating. bombs were planted inside two taxis. one detonated at the city's main jewelry market at the height of the business hours, leaving behind a trail of destruction. the second of the mainland parks, the gateway of india. more than 50 people were killed, and nearly 118 wounded. last week, courts convicted the three suspects of planting
. the second, at the city's main ndmark, the gateway of india. more than 50 people we killed and nearly 0 were wounded. last week, a special court nvicted two men and a woman of pnting the bombs. outside, the main prosecution lawyer had this to say >> this decision is very important anit will send a strong signalo anye wo wants to engage in this kind of illelactivity costing the lives of the innoct population. > a judge handed them the death penalty. all three have plead not guilty andre expected to appeal againsthe sentence. their trial took place in high serity and under a poweul anti-terrorism law that no nger exists. prosecuts argued that the bombings were carefully planned arab -- and orn act of extreme brutality. all three deserve e harsh sentence, ty said. the bombings were saido be in retaliati of anti-muslim riots in 2002. all threare said to be members of a pakiani militants group accused of carrying out last year's mumbai aacks, whichas increased iction between india and pakistan. >> jt a footnote ther kistanssued a global alert or 13 suspects in connection with last year's mumbai a
. the other was that the main landmark, the gateway to india. more than 50 were killed, nearly 180 wounded. last week, a special court connected -- convicted three individuals of plotting bombings. outside court, the main prosecution lawyer had this to say. >> this decision is very important and will give us [inaudible] illegal activity, taking the lives of the innocent. >> today, the judge handed out the death penalty. all three pled not guilty, and are expected to appeal the sentence. they're trying to place under high security and a powerful anti-terrorism law that no longer exists. prosecutors argued that the bombings were carefully planned and an act of extreme brutality. all three deserve the hearts sentence, they say. the bombings were said to be retaliation for anti-muslim riots in 2002. all three are said to be members of a band pakistani militant group accused of carrying out last year's mumbai attacks, which led to increased tension between india and pakistan. >> just a footnote, pakistan has asked the international police agency interpol to issue a global alert for 13 suspects
, israel, india and pakistan, they are not bound by the treaty, but iran is. iran violated that treaty in approximate a series of approximate a series of differen iran has been sanctioned by the united nations for those violations. the sanctions are too weak to cause a change in iran's behavior, but at least it it demonstrates iran has violated the treaty responsibilities. the fact is that while iran has the right to develop electricity from nuclear power plants, they are flaring their natural gas they could generate electricity for a couple kilo watt. >> host: why are they? >> guest: they have no way to export it, liquiified natural gas plant to markets. >> host: back to afghanistan, full page, photograph for afghans, a new test of democracy, their presidential election. their elections are coming up in 10 days, i believe august 20th. what are your hopes for the election? >> guest: a fair and free election would be outstanding step toward building afghanistan as a state. i can't tell you that i'd vote for this candidate or that can d candidate? >> host: is karz ai the best candid
lash. >>> and from india, a human rights gro charged today tha theolice system in that country needs some jor overhaul to meet internation andards. human rightsatchsaid that while india is modernizing rapidly the police coinue to use old thods including abuse and teats. it said the poce sometimes detained pele illegally, torture and kill spects and refuseto investigate crimes against the politically powerful. thindian government had no immediate response. >>> was the british government complicit in the torture of terror suspects in a secretork conducted by wtern intelligent agencies ovethe last eight ars? that questiowas raised after the release of a paistani man ben yan mohammed from amecan custody at guaanamo bay, cuba. when mohammed returned to britai he sued the governme in a test case ciming the intelligence ageny, miify was involved in his investigations while government aims its got nothing thard a paliamentary commissn is now calling for independent vestigation as we hear fromandrew thomasf itn. >> reporter: british interrogators quesoning uspects abroad ether just aftemistre
robbed their national treasuries and abused their powers? >>> a court in india sentenced two men and a woman to death today for their roles in the 2003 terror attack in the city of mumbai. in that attack two taxis blew up within minutes of one another, killing 52 people. investigators say the three were members of the lashkary tibia, a banned militant group that has also been blamed for the attacks in mumbai that killed 106 people late last year. lawyers for those sentenced today said they would appeal. death sentences in india are rarely carried out. >>> this was another deadly day for u.s. forces in afghanistan, as casualties in that war rise sharply. the u.s. military said four marines were killed when a roadside bomb struck their vehicle in western afghanistan. in the six days of this month, at least 15 western troops have been killed in afghanistan. >>> in the middle east today, a prominent human rights group said thousands of rockets fired from the gaza strip into israel were unlawful and unjustified, and amount to war crimes by the hamas leadership in gaza. those attacks c
, india and pakistan, they are not bound by the treaty, but iran is. iran violated that treaty in approximate a series of different respects and iran has been sanctioned by the united nations for those violations. the sanctions are too weak to cause a change in iran's behavior, but at least it it demonstrates iran has violated the treaty responsibilities. the fact is that while iran has the right to develop electricity from nuclear power plants, they are flaring their natural gas they could generate electricity for a couple kilo watt. >> host: why are they? >> guest: they have no way to export it, liquiified natural gas plant to markets. >> host: back to afghanistan, full page, photograph for afghans, a new test of democracy, their presidential election. their elections are coming up in 10 days, i believe august 20th. what are your hopes for the election? >> guest: a fair and free election would be outstanding step toward building afghanistan as a state. i can't tell you that i'd vote for this candidate or that can d candidate? >> host: is karz ai the best candidate to hav
. we will start right on time. the ambassador from india is here. [laughter] [applause] but councilman jack evans is here. [applause] we have representatives from different embassies, as well. let me begin this morning by introducing our special guest, dr. christina romer. as many of you may know, she is the chair of the council of economic advisers. that position was established by the employment act of 1946 where it was decided that the president of united states needed independent, objective economic analysis and advice. from the time that the council was greeted the late 40's, it has had some of the most distinguished economists serving in that position. it has had a long history of very distinguished economists and dr. romer is within the tradition. she is what the best known economists in the country and one of the best known macro economist in the country. she served for 20 years as a member of the faculty of the university of california, berkeley. in that position, she became an expert on the depression, the causes and consequences, and how the u.s. government responded. she ca
they looked at the impact of a flood in countries like india and and parts of asia, and neighboring countries. guest: if you think about water as are most of will and life support system and the vehicle through which we will feel the impact of climate change, weather drought or desertification, floods, rising sea levels, melting glaciers, seasonality of rivers creag before they ran year round. all of that is absolutely going to change the world as we know it. host: with we'll get to your phone calls. we have folks waiting. i did want to give folks a look at what's blue august is about. >> the ocean needs our help. time is running out. >> people have heard about global warming for years but it is only the past five years that experts really understood that carbon dioxide is causing problems for the oceans as well. what is worrisome it has not been on the radar. >> in a few decades it will profoundly altered oceans chemistry, rapidly making the water more acidic. >> scientists have demonstrated that if we continue to pollute as we are now, the ocean as said it will double by the end of the cent
in december. there are international negotiations. i do not know how to get china and india to come along. if they will go along with it and we will not lose all and we will not lose all manufacturers to china understand, china is the number one and matter of this pollution. not the united states. india is even more adamant about not doing anything. then, we lose our jobs. we want to get china under the umbrella. number two, it takes the 2/3 vote in the united states senate to get it done. there is some protection for our industry and some protection for our consumers if we do it through international treaty. >> glad to see you again today. i am a veteran. i am very proud to be a veteran. [applause] i belong to the american legion. in order for a person to be called a veteran that has to serve in the military, there are lots of people that are called veterans that cannot belong to the american legion. congress after world war roman one set up the american legion. is the largest veterans' organization in the world. we have a lot of people. in order to belong to the american legion, you had
wonder because they are on the other side of pakistan. it would be a good strategic movement if india made the move towards bin laden, if he is still alive. another question, perhaps we are already monitoring bin laden? perhaps our intelligence has him on the phone all the time? could that be possible? guest: i wish it were, but it would speak to some kind of nefarious plot. if he were on the phone and we have not killed him. if we are listening to him on the phone we can geo-locate him and he would be yesterday's news. so, i seriously doubt we're listening to him. secondly, part of the problem we have in afghanistan is we have already allowed a large indian presence, both economically, and they are doing a lot of construction with people dressed as civilians but who are really military engineers. people in the u.s. do not realize the degree of paranoia between two nuclear-armed countries, pakistan and india. to allow an indian military forces into pakistan would turn the pakistan knees entirely away from us. -- the pakistanis away from us. it is interesting as an idea, but in the lon
today said they uld appeal. death sentences in india are rarely carried o. >>> this was ather deadly day for u.s.orces in afghanistan, as casuties in tat war rise sharply. e u.s. military said four marines wereilled when a adside bomb struck their vehicle western afghanistan. in the six da of this month, at ast 15 western tros have been kild in afghanistan. >>> in the middle east today, a ominent human rights group said thousands of rockets fired from the gaza strip into israe re unlawful and unjustifi, and aunt to war crimes by the hamas leadership in gaa. those attack culnated in the three-week war agait hamas that began late last decber. in his port,uman rights watch said hamas should plicly anunce the rocket attac and punish thoseresponsible. three israeli civilians wer kill by rket fire. and human rits watch said hamas also put palestines at grt list. >> they fired from near civilian areas becae they wanted t prevent israelrom strikin back through t fear of csing vilian casualties. both of those things, fing from a civilian area wh ere is any opportunity no to and deliberately firi
opportunities young people have in india and brazil and all these other countries that develop mentally 30 years ago were on a par with the countries they are in now. but they know in the arab world that they have slipped farther and farther behind. so the desire to join the rest of the world, be part of this global trend, i think is a very powerful tool. >> thank you. are there other questions or comments? there is one here and in one in the back. >> i am from east africa. i originally am from somebody. i want to share a grievance, from the last two months which gives me some kind of glimpse of hope in the region now we are talking about. what was the launch for the center and training for human rights in doha are. we had commissioner just launch it. and it was a ceremony which i attend. i found activist, and i hope, i say this, for the future. activists from doha are, from kuwait, there was none at all, women began, and some of them come in and speaking of freely because it largely focus on democracy. someone training. but highlighting, pointing out the difficulty and now we're talking about t
. host: hobart, indiana. george on the india line. caller: good morning, gentlemen. glad you took my call. i just don't understand for one thing, mr. pappas. how come there is no flexibility between the parties when i have -- my wife and i have two insurance companies, employer insurance companies and we are consumed almost virtually 20% of our gross income, we are not talking about shared costs. or pharmaceutical or anything catastrophic that would happen to us. we are still going to be placed into bankruptcy. why isn't there some sort of consideration? why can't the two chambers of the house come to some sort of compromise to where we are put in a sunset or triggering mechanism to where we could try this new system of universal healthcare coverage? i don't want to use socialism because it is such a key word, a buzzword for a lot of medicaid and medicare people. they think that they are not part of the socialist medicine group. guest: what george just shared with us, i think, is very important and it reminds me of my parents' own situation. my parents live in massachusetts where they ha
or india or accepted today, de facto in the nuclear weapons. but the north korean case so different from india or pakistan. this is a smaller -- a small and opaque country, a record of proliferating bad things, whether that's ballistic missiles or nuclear technology. so there's no way that the united states or the world can accept this country as a nike lar weapon state. >> vick to cha, thank you so much for joining us. kiran? oh. >> live out to rob marciano. he's hanging out somewhere on friday. where is he today? he's at the world's largest yardsale. that's right, he's hunting for bargains this morning. there he is. >> what is that? it's some kind of pottery. >> vase or -- >> who knows what he's going to find. >> hello! >> he's going to join us to tell us how they pulled this thing off. >> that looks fantastic. . unlock an outdoor dreamland for your indoor cat. exciting flavor combinations, plus a touch of garden greens make it irresistible. indoor delights. feed the senses. it's the chevy open house. and now, with the cash for clunkers program, a great deal gets even better. let us re
that these people have access in how the world is governed and what opportunities young people have been india, brazil and developmentally 30 years ago with more anbar but they know in the arab world they have slipped further and further behind. the desire to join the rest of the world as part of a global trend is a very powerful tool. >> thank you. other questions or comments? >> originally i am from somalia. the last two months i have had a glimmer of hope one of these was the center for training of human rights event of. we have just launched and i found an activist double feature from bahrain particularly. and women with the traditional attire and some of them went to the trainings but they point* out the difference but together [inaudible] one person from doha was not that much educated but taking a real issue in his country at one point* they said he should be removed from the meeting. so i am thinking that the possibility of the incite with some newspapers the other is the establishment is part of the commission for human rights. where independent people come together maybe this is the
opportunities young people have in india, brazil and all these other countries that developmentally 30 years ago were on par with the countries there. but they know in the arab world they slipped farther and farther behind. so this desire to join the rest of the world and be part of this global trend, i think, is a very powerful tool. >> thank you. are there other questions or comments? there's one here and then one in the back. >> i'm from east africa. originally i'm from somalia. i just want to share with you, which has given me some glimpse of hope in the subregion we were talking about. one was the launch of the arab -- what do you call the office for -- center for the training of human rights in doha with the office of the head commission for human rights. and the ceremony which i attended i found an activist and i hope -- i'm not saying -- the circle will feature activists from doha, from kuwait, from bahrain particularly and women again with their traditional attire and some of them coming and speaking outñk frequently because it's largely focus on government and they went to training. b
trade, which is to say europe, china, japan, maybe in the future brazil, india and so on, as long as they are not on this fta list and the ogrin is marginal. then you have the doha round. centrality of agriculture to it is very important to poor countries and i think american farm -- farmers and ranchers have a good case to say that their industry is more restricted and more limited by foreign trade barriers than any other. agriculture is about eight or 10% of american exports which is not going to go even if there is a big and successful doha round. so i think if the administration goes to the public and says we want to make a big push for doha at least as it is and for these fta is the public will say the president is a smart guy, i kind of trust in. not got much to do with me. and given that trade is a difficult issue within the democratic party, i think of the administration is going to make a big push for trade, and spend political capital on it, it needs to have a somewhat different agenda that will do more for america as an economy and do more for our national security goal
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)